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WHY YOUR COSMETICS SHOULD BE VEGAN, EVEN IF YOU'RE NOT

WHY YOUR COSMETICS SHOULD BE VEGAN, EVEN IF YOU'RE NOT

Veganism is on the rise!

If you’re still confused as to what ‘vegan’ means, it’s simple; no animal byproducts, period. If you’re a strict vegan this also means no wool, silk, leather, or any animal bits in your food, cosmetics, drinks, etc.

You may be asking yourself now, why does it matter if my cosmetics are vegan?

Well, besides the fact that your skin is the largest external organ, the bloodstream absorbs what’s on the skin in 26 seconds. Every serum, foundation, nail polish, makeup remover, and face mask to touch the skin has made an impact. Now, take a look at the packaging and ingredients. If a brand is vegan they will happily display let the consumer know, but you may start reading the ingredients and think to yourself, “what the heck does any of this mean?” Some of ingredients will have aliases to disguise the fact that they’re in fact byproducts of animals.

Most common:

Tallow: rendered animal fat; commonly found in foundations, eye makeup, and lipstick
Guanine: crushed fish scales; most commonly found in mascara, nail polish, and lipstick
Cochineal Dye/Carmine: dye made from crushed cochineal beetles; found in lipstick and blush
Gelatin: boiled skin, tendons, ligaments, and bones; found in creamy cosmetics, SFX, and nail treatments
Lanolin: excretion from wool-bearing mammals; found in makeup removers and lipsticks
Squalene: extracted from liver of sharks; found in lipstick and skin care
Ambergris: waxy oil found in the stomachs of whales; common in perfumes
Collagen: fibrous protein from animal tissue; found in lip products and skin care (P.S. it does not help us rebuild our own)
Estrogen/Estradiol: extracted from the urine of pregnant horses; found in restorative moisturizers and perfumes

The United States’ standards in the beauty industry are so low, they only ban about 11 ingredients.

When an animal dies, whether it be a pet, roadkill, or what-have-you, it is sent to a rendering plant. This facility takes the salvageable parts of the animal (see above) and sells it. The number one buyer of these products is the cosmetics industry. Animal byproducts are easily obtainable and since they’re so cheap it cuts production cost for these beauty companies, letting the consumer buy more products for less coin.

So, just as something to consider, try reading the ingredient before you purchase your next cosmetics.

With Love,

Beaut Shroom

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